Economic outcomes in small-scale fish trade: The role of gender norms

By Emma Rice, Abigail Bennett & Patrick Kawaye
Economic analysis of market data was conducted by the research team to understand quantitative differences in livelihood outcomes for women and men engaging in the same trading activities at the same markets. Results from economic models show that gender is a key factor influencing earnings in fish trade and that other important drivers, including processing type and selling market size and location, are also shaped by gender. The team found that while women and men participate in fish trade in near-equal numbers in Malawi, women are earning less money per unit than men and tend to trade in smaller volumes.

A Review of the Multi-dimensional Perspectives of Taboos on Gender Roles of Fisherfolk in the Global South

By Ayodele Oloko, Sarah Harper, Kafayat Fakoya and U. Rashid Sumaila
Traditional knowledge and belief systems can play an important role in contemporary governance systems, making valuable contributions towards sustainable fisheries; however, understanding the role that taboos play in mediating human interactions with ocean resources, especially those limiting women’s access to such resources, is necessary for advancing gender equity in small-scale fisheries.

Participatory Action Research enhances fish smokers’ willingness to adopt social change and technology innovation in Lagos, Nigeria

By Kafayat Fakoya, Ayojesutomi Abiodun-Solanke, Adenike Boyo, Shehu Akintola, Kafayat Ajelara, Mayowa Olasope & Ismot Olabamiji
A recent project in Lagos, Nigeria focused on the use of participatory action research (PAR) to change the beliefs, dispositions, and interactions between fish smokers and researchers. It demonstrated how PAR stimulated interest among fish smokers in biomass briquettes and a prototype drum smoking kiln. It also encouraged co-ownership of the research and the readiness to use contemporary technology.